What Does Divorce Mean for Your Vacation Home?

If you own a vacation home, odds are that you consider it a place of serenity and fond memories. When couples separate and divorce is on the horizon, the question is inevitably asked: “What happens to our vacation house?”

First, you and your spouse can always agree on what to do with your vacation home. Examples of the types of agreements you and your spouse could reach are: agreement to sell it and divide the proceeds, one spouse could buy-out the other spouse’s interest and keep the home, or perhaps the home becomes part of a bigger picture estate plan or trust so that children and grandchildren may continue to enjoy it, despite any divorce. You can agree with your spouse about the fate of your vacation home at any time during the divorce process. You don’t have to wait until the divorce is final.

If you and your spouse cannot agree and you have a contested divorce case, your trial will likely be a year or more away. The court will decide what will happen to your vacation home only at the end of the entire process – and the court is limited to two options:

  1. Order the sale of a jointly titled vacation home and the equal division of any sales proceeds; or
  2. If the vacation home is titled only in one spouse’s name, the court cannot transfer title to the other spouse. However, if the home was acquired during the marriage with marital funds, the non-titled spouse has a martial property interest in the home. The court may order the spouse who owns the home to make a monetary award payment to the other spouse in consideration of their interest in the home and as part of the overall equitable distribution of marital property. “Equitable” does not always mean equal – who gets what depends on the courts consideration of a variety factors – some of which include the duration of the marriage, each party’s age, health, financial circumstances, and contributions to the marriage and property, and the circumstances that contributed to the divorce.

If you and your spouse do not agree on what to do with your vacation home, consider that prior to the actual divorce, the court cannot:

  • Force you or your spouse to sell your home;
  • Force you or your spouse to refinance any debt associated with the home;
  • Force your or your spouse to move out of a jointly titled vacation home. The one exception to this is if a party is ordered stay-away from a vacation home being used as one or both parties’ residence incident to a domestic violence protective order;
  • Force you or your spouse to pay the mortgage or carrying costs.

Also, if you and your spouse do not agree on what to do with vacation home, and it is titled in joint name or solely in your spouse’s name, the court cannot transfer it to you.

You and your spouse can enter into an agreement to do something other than what the court can do, which is legally binding and enforceable.

Before filing in court or entering into any divorce related agreement, you should consult with a family law attorney to determine what effect this has on the other issues in your case.

The Court has more options when it comes to what can happen to your primary home in a divorce. For more information about that, see our article, “What does divorce mean for your home?

For more information, contact Heather at hscollier@lerchearly.com and Erin at elkopelman@lerchearly.com.


How to Uncover Your Assets and Financial Situation

Get your Arms Around Your Family Finances

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

One of the most common concerns I hear from my clients is that they do not know their family’s or spouse’s finances. This is more common than you think.  According to some statistics from last year, in 42% of relationships one partner in the relationship handles the finances, and in 46% of marriages the couples have separate bank accounts. This means almost half of married people don’t know their complete financial picture. 

If you don’t know about your family’s finances, and you’re not comfortable asking your spouse or your spouse is non-cooperative, here are eight easy self-help steps you can take to start putting the pieces together. 

  1. Make an inventory of your incomes, assets and debts – just what you know. You can start building from there.
  2. Gather copies of the pay stubs, bank account statements and credit card statements that you can. You can search shared filing cabinets, go online to shared accounts and your individual accounts, or physically to your bank.
  3. Get copies of your income tax returns. Many people don’t know what their spouse earns or where their spouse banks, but they often file joint tax returns. Joint income tax returns will show your combined incomes, and your and your spouse’s interest and dividend income, including the institutions from where it came from, so you will know where you and your spouse bank.  If you don’t have a copy of your income tax returns, you can ask your accountant, or you can request a copy of your tax transcript for several years back online from the IRS at IRs.gov.
  4. Run a credit report on yourself. This will tell you what debts are in your name.
  5. Make an appointment for you, or you and your spouse, with your financial advisor to find out what you have.
  6. Make an appointment for you and your spouse to review or create an estate plan. The first thing most estate attorneys will do is make an inventory of your assets.
  7. See if you can do a Public Records Search on your spouse. A public records search scours the internet for public records that match certain criteria of the individual you are researching and gives you a report of what it finds. There is usually a fee for this. It often shows information about the individual’s court records, social media, addresses and telephone numbers, information from credit bureaus, asset ownership, and business associations.
  8. Open your mail and save everything you get for a full three months. You can just stick it in an envelope or snap a picture of it with your phone. This isn’t helpful if your spouse gets their mail sent to them at their office or electronically. Many of my clients tell me that their spouse always gets the mail. In that case, sign up on the United States Postal Service’s website for Informed Delivery. Informed Delivery is a service that scans and sends you images of the outside of your mail. That way, even if you never tangibly have your mail, you’ll who you and your spouse are receiving mail from.

Getting your arms around your family’s finances is the first step to taking control of your financial future. 

For more information, contact Erin at 301-347-1261 or elkopelman@lerchearly.com.

To Vax or Not To Vax: Co-Parents Face Tough Decision When It Comes to Vaccinating Kids

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

Ever since it was announced that children age 16 and older can get vaccinated against COVID-19, the phone is ringing and emails are popping from clients — many of whom I haven’t heard from in some time. The issue many of them are struggling with is that they and their co-parent disagree on whether to get their children vaccinated.

Whether your child receives a vaccination is a medical decision. Medical decisions of minor children are controlled by whomever has decision-making authority or legal custody. If you have a custody agreement or order, your agreement or order should says who has legal custody or decision making authority, and therefore who gets to determine whether your children will get a vaccination.

For those of you with joint legal custody or joint decision making authority, determining what to do may be more difficult. Joint legal custody or joint decision making authority means that you and your co-parent are supposed to discuss and make any decisions jointly. For those of you with joint legal custody or joint decision-making authority, check your custody agreement or order carefully. There may be a dispute-resolution provision requiring you to take specific steps to resolve the impasse before taking further action.

If you and your co-parent disagree about whether to vaccinate your children, take your current custody agreement or order and consult a family lawyer. There are creative solutions you perhaps haven’t explored, which have been successful in resolving legal custody decisions. In addition, they can advise you about what next options are available.

For more information, contact Erin at 301-347-1261 or elkopelman@lerchearly.com.

Should I Borrow or Accept Money from Family While Getting Divorced?

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

Cash flow is a common concern for most people going through separation or divorce. Many clients ask me if they can accept or borrow money from family.

While accepting or borrowing money from family may seem like an economical option because it often does not require a loan agreement, interest, penalties or preapproval, it can actually have unintended and potentially harmful consequences on the remaining aspects of your divorce.

Gifts from Family

Two issues that arise when you receive gifts from your family to pay expenses if you are divorcing are: (1) those gifts can be considered income to you; and (2) that gift, had you not spent it, would be yours to keep in divorce and not divided with your spouse.

First, gifts from your family received during the marriage, especially if given routinely, can be included and counted as your income in divorce.  The gifts can increase your income for purposes of determining alimony and child support, with the potential effect of requiring you to pay more or receive less alimony and/or child support. Also, the gifts can be considered in the equitable division of marital property. Therefore, receiving gifts from family may have a negative impact on you in the outcome of your divorce as it relates to alimony, child support and the equitable division of marital property.

Second, gifts from your family to you individually during the marriage are your sole, separate and non-marital property. Generally, if you can prove the source of the gift is from your family and that it is not comingled with marital property, then you keep gift, and it does not get divided between you and your spouse in divorce. If you receive gifts from your family, you should not spend them. You should instead keep them and not comingle them with marital property. For steps on how to protect gifts from family, check out this article on Steps to Protect Your Inheritance and Gifts Received from Third Parties.

Assume that you’re getting divorced, there is $50,000 in marital funds, you need to pay bills of $20,000, and your parents give you $20,000. You have two options. In Option A, you spend the $20,000 gift from your parents. In divorce, you and your spouse will equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $50,000, so you and your spouse will each get approximately $25,000 in marital funds. In Option B, you preserve the $20,000 gift from your parents and do not comingle it with marital funds, and you pay the $20,000 in bills from marital funds. In divorce, you and your spouse will equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $30,000, so you and your spouse will each get approximately $15,000 in marital funds, and you will keep $20,000 from your parents. So, while your spouse ends up with $15,000, you end up with $35,000. You are better off with Option B.  Therefore, if you need money, spend marital money first, rather than gifts from family.  Preserve and do not spend the gifts from your family.

Loans from Family

Two issues that arise if you receive loans from your family to pay expenses in divorce are: (1) you may be left solely responsible for those loans; and (2) loans from family may not be given as much weight as other debts.

First, you are likely to be left solely responsible for the debts you incur in your sole name.

Maryland Courts cannot allocate debts, so after divorce you will be solely responsible for the debts in your name. D.C. Courts can distribute debts accumulated during the marriage, but there are no guarantees in court. If you are getting divorce and individually borrow money from your family to pay bills, the remaining and unspent marital property will be equitably divided. While debt is considered in the equitable division of marital property, in Maryland you will be left responsible for the debts in your individual name, and in D.C. you could be. So, when possible, it is better to spend marital property rather than taking a loan.

Assume that you’re getting divorced in Maryland, there is $50,000 in marital funds, and you need $20,000 to pay bills. You have two options. In Option A, you take a loan for $20,000. In this situation, at the time of divorce you and your spouse will each equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $50,000, so in divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $25,000 each, but you have a $20,000 loan that you are solely responsible for. In actuality, this leaves you with only $5,000 net and your spouse with $25,000 net. In Option B, you pay the $20,000 from the $50,000 marital funds. This leaves $30,000 remaining in marital funds, so in the divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $15,000 each. You are better off with Option B. Therefore, if you need money, spend marital money first before you take a loan.

Second, if you are taking a loan, it is up to the Court how much to weigh the evidence in their ultimate decision when equitably dividing the marital property (and in D.C. when also equitably dividing the debts accumulated during the marriage). Courts may be less likely to heavily weigh debts from family, as opposed to debts from banks or on credit cards. Therefore, if incurring a debt is necessary, then consider getting a debt from a bank or putting it on a credit card. If you choose to get a loan from family, then you should at a minimum sign a note or other loan document confirming the money is a loan and the repayment terms.

In summary, you are likely better off spending marital assets, as opposed to spending money from family, whether gifts or loans because whatever marital assets are left will be divided between you and your spouse. If you do need money and cannot access marital funds, then I suggest you take a loan, rather than spending gift money, and check out my article Should I Get a Loan While Getting Divorced? 

Each case is different, so if you find yourself needing money, you should consult a family law attorney. At Lerch, Early & Brewer, we guide our clients through the day-to-day decisions they have to make in the divorce process so that they make decisions that are in their best interests. 

For more information, contact Erin at 301-347-1261 or elkopelman@lerchearly.com.

Should I Get a Loan While Getting Divorced?

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

If you’re going through a separation or divorce and cash flow is tight, you’re not alone. Many families going through separation or divorce find it difficult to get their hands on cash and pay expenses, especially with the increased cost of going from having one household to two, and paying lawyers. Many people wonder if they should get a loan.

In general, at the time of divorce, the then-existing marital assets are valued and equitably divided between you and your spouse. In valuing an asset, the fair market value is reduced by any loan on which it is collateral.

For example, the value of a house is reduced by its’ mortgage. The Court determines what is equitable after considering a list of factors, which include, but are not limited to: each spouse’s contributions to the family, the economic circumstances of each party, the circumstances that contributed to the estrangement of the marriage, the duration of the marriage, each party’s age and health, etc. These factors include consideration of each party’s debts. While equitable does not mean equal, absent extraordinary circumstances, the division of marital property often ends up being equal or close to it. Also, in divorce, Maryland Courts cannot allocate debts, so you are stuck with the debts in your name; whereas the D.C. Court can distribute debts accumulated during the marriage. Therefore, when possible, it is better to spend marital property, rather than taking a loan.

For example, say that you are in Maryland and are getting divorced. You and your spouse have $50,000 in marital funds, and you need $20,000 to pay bills. You have two options. In Option A, you take a loan for $20,000. In this situation, at the time of divorce you and your spouse will each equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $50,000, so in divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $25,000 each, but you have a $20,000 loan that you are solely responsible for. In actuality, this leaves you with only $5,000 net and your spouse with $25,000 net. In Option B, you pay the $20,000 from the $50,000 marital funds. This leaves $30,000 remaining in marital funds, so in the divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $15,000 each. You are better off with Option B.

If you find yourself needing money in divorce, I usually suggest, in order of priority:

  1. If possible, always spend marital assets first on your reasonable living expenses and attorney’s fees. This will reduce the marital property being divided, but this is preferable to taking out a loan where you could be solely responsible for paying it back.
  2. If you cannot access marital assets to spend first, then take a withdrawal from a marital asset. Taking a withdraw from a marital asset reduces the value of that asset, so the reduced value is considered when valuing the asset for purposes of equitably dividing it. Again, this is preferable to taking out a loan where you could be solely responsible for paying it back.
  3. If you cannot take a withdrawal from a marital asset, then take a loan from a marital asset. Taking a loan against a marital asset can reduce the value of that asset, so the reduced value may be considered when valuing the asset for purposes of equitably dividing it. However, in Maryland, if the loan is in your sole name, you will be solely responsible for the loan payments in the divorce.
  4. Only if you cannot spend marital assets or take a withdrawal or loan against a marital asset should you turn to the option of incurring non-collateralized debt.

Each case is different, so if you find yourself needing money, you should consult a family law attorney. At Lerch, Early & Brewer, we guide our clients through the day-to-day decisions they have to make in the divorce process so that they make decisions that are in their best interests.

For more information, contact Erin at 301-347-1261 or elkopelman@lerchearly.com.

Can You Really Get Divorced From Your Couch?

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

Who would have imagined years ago that in 2020 you would be able get divorced from your living room sofa? It is as if it were predicted in the movie “Back to the Future,” like video phones or hoverboards (sort of).

However, this change allowing people to get divorced from their own homes is not the result of some creative Hollywood writer, but because the COVID-19 pandemic occurred during a time when the technology was ripe to go virtual.

The pandemic has caused hardships to many individuals and business. It has forced people to work and do business differently, including our court systems. While the pandemic has been strenuous on our court systems, causing a re-shuffling and backlog of cases, it has also forced our legal system into the digital age.

Our Court system had to quickly adapt to working remotely. Hearings and trials that were almost exclusively in person were converted in a short period of time to occurring virtually over Zoom and WebEx. While no system is perfect and glitches need to be worked out, it is now possible for a person to decide to divorce, find and retain a lawyer and go through their entire divorce process, even if it consists of a full trial, in their own home.

Many hearings are happening quicker and more efficiently. Pre-pandemic it was customary for Courts to schedule multiple hearings at the same time, so when scheduled to be in Court, a client is paying their lawyer to travel, and while in Court there is often significant time spent waiting for your case to be heard. All of this has significantly been reduced when cases are heard virtually, which can be a big financial savings for clients.

While the ability to take care of everything without going anywhere is logistically easier and may have a financial savings, it is important to keep in mind that it does not necessarily make divorce easier emotionally.

For many, divorcing during the pandemic is more difficult. The lack of a personal connection and human touch with their lawyers may be stressful. Moreover, the inability to be surrounded by an in-person emotional support network of family and friends except through virtual and social distancing interactions may be harder not just on those going through divorce, but also on their children.

At Lerch Early, we are highly cognizant of the emotional and financial stresses of divorce on our clients and keep that in mind as we guide them through their divorces.

Why Maryland’s New Augmented Estate Law Means You May Need a Prenup

You May Also Need to Revise the One You Already Have

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

Maryland’s new Augmented Estate Law was created to enable a surviving spouse, who was not adequately provided for by his/her deceased spouse, to elect to receive a share of substantially more of the deceased spouse’s assets than ever before.

But, it has the major, and perhaps unintended, consequence of affecting some estate plans and prenuptial and postnuptial agreements already in place.

In Maryland, if a spouse dies without adequately providing for his/her surviving spouse, then unless the surviving spouse has waived an interest in his/her deceased spouse’s estate, the surviving spouse is entitled to receive part of the deceased spouse’s estate.

This entitlement, commonly referred to as the “elective share” is one-third to one-half (depending on whether the deceased spouse has a surviving decedent) of part the deceased spouse’s estate. The purpose of this law is to protect surviving spouses from not being provided for by their spouse upon their spouse’s death.

Previously, the elective share only applied to the part of the deceased spouse’s estate that passed through probate. But, effective October 1, 2020, Maryland’s new “Augmented Estate” Law enables a surviving spouse, upon the death of his/her deceased spouse, to receive a greater share of the deceased spouse’s assets than ever before by applying the elective share to both assets that pass through probate and assets that do not pass through probate. 

Many assets do not pass through probate. Examples of assets that do not pass through probate are: Transfer on Death (TOD) accounts, accounts jointly titled with others; some trusts; and assets with beneficiary designations, such as 401K accounts and life insurance policies.

Previously, unless the deceased spouse set up his/her estate for their surviving spouse to receive assets that do not pass through probate, such as these, then the surviving spouse could not receive an elective share of them upon his/her spouse’s death. 

The new law enables a surviving spouse to receive an elective share of assets that pass through probate and assets that do not pass through probate.  The effect of this new law is that more types of assets are included in those that a surviving spouse may take an elective share of.  Therefore, surviving spouses who are not adequately provided for by their deceased spouse’s estate plans will be entitled to receive an elective share of more types of assets, which, depending on the deceased party’s holdings, likely enables to surviving party to more assets.

Similarly, spouses who did careful estate planning to exclude certain assets from passing through probate so their surviving spouse would not be able to receive an elective share of these assets will need to re-think their strategy. 

Many people want to limit what they leave their spouse upon their death, especially in the event they have children from a prior marriage who they want their assets to go to. By agreement, a spouse can waive his/her rights to make claim to an elective share or to his/her spouse’s estate.

Prenuptial and postnuptial agreements allow you to make binding and enforceable estate provisions, such as a waiver of his/her spouse’s estate or to claim an elective share, or mandate what one spouse receives in the event of their spouse’s death. If you have or want an estate plan that does not leave the majority of your assets to your spouse, you should consider getting a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement.

In addition, if you have a prenuptial or postnuptial agreement that limits what you are giving your spouse in the event of your death, you should revisit that through the lenses of how, if at all, this new law may change the effect of your intentions, and consult a lawyer as to whether you need to amend your agreement accordingly, assuming your significant other is willing.

What You Need to Know About Maryland’s Revised Child Support Guidelines

Maryland’s Child Support Guidelines, which are used by the Courts to establish and set child support in most cases in Maryland, had not been substantively adjusted in 10 years. The new law, which updates the prior Maryland Child Support Guidelines statute, is effective for all cases filed after October 1, 2020.

There are two noteworthy updates to the Maryland Child Support Guidelines statute – one, intended to address the “cliff effect” (i.e. a substantial decrease in child support) that occurs once the non-custodial parent reaches “shared physical custody”, which was formerly 128 overnights per year or more (or 35% of the overnights or more). The other – extending the presumptive application of the Guidelines to families earning up to $30,000 per month, thus doubling the former threshold.

1. Increasing the Threshold for Application of Guidelines

Prior to October 1, 2020, the Courts, unless they found sufficient reason(s) to deviate therefrom, were required to apply the result of the Maryland Child Support Guidelines calculator in all cases in which the combined adjusted actual income of the family was $15,000 per month (or $180,000 per year) or less. Now, the Maryland Child Support Guidelines calculator result is the presumptively correct amount for all families earning a combined adjusted actual income of $30,000 per month (or $360,000 per year).

This should provide more prompt and predictable results for families earning between $180,000-$360,000 per year. Above $30,000 per month or $360,000 per year, the Court has discretion in determining the level of child support.

2. Addressing the “Cliff Effect” in Shared Custody Situations

Under the former Maryland Child Support Guidelines, a family transitioned from using the “sole custody” calculation method to the “shared custody” calculation method once the non-custodial parent had the child or children in his or her care 35% or more overnights per year. That transition produced a “cliff effect” – a large drop in child support for the custodial parent once the 35% threshold was met. Not only was the “cliff effect” hard to understand for parents and courts alike – it also led to custody and access disputes motivated, in part, to manipulate child support.

The new Maryland Child Support Guidelines define shared custody as the non-custodial parent having the children for at least 25% of the overnights or more, with incremental adjustments in child support when a parent has between 25% and 50% overnights, to lessen the impact of the former “cliff effect” at 35% overnights. This means non-custodial parents who have their child or children 25% of the overnights or more should see their child support obligations decrease under the new guidelines from what they would have been under the former guidelines.

As to how a non-custodial parent who has their child 25% or more of the overnights will see their child support obligations decrease, take as an example a family where both parents of one child earn adjusted actual incomes of $12,000 per month ($24,000 combined). If Parent A has the child 75% of the overnights and Parent B has the child 25% of the overnights, under the former guidelines, Parent B would pay child support of $1,554 per month, but under the new guidelines, Parent B pays child support of $1,330 per month. If in that situation Parent A has the child 66% of the overnights and Parent B has the child 34% of the overnights, under the former guidelines, Parent B would pay child support of $1,554 per month, but under the new guidelines, Parent B pays child support of $746 per month.

For cases filed after October 1, 2020, the new child support guidelines will be used to establish initial child support orders, both pendente lite (pending trial) and permanently, as well as to establish the level of child support in cases involving modifications of existing child support orders.

Existing child support orders can be modified based only on a material change of circumstances. Courts have found a material change of circumstances in numerous instances, including but not limited to loss of a job, medical issues, retirement, education issues, changes in the needs of the child, etc. However, the adoption of the new child support guidelines is not, in and of itself, a material change of circumstances for purposes of modification of child support.

If you have minor children, adult destitute or adult disabled children, you should consult a family law attorney about how the new guidelines may affect your child support obligation or award.

Getting Divorced? Get off Social Media!

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

“Privacy is dead, and social media holds the smoking gun.” – Pete Cashmore, CEO of Mashable

Eighty-one percent of lawyers find social media networking evidence worth presenting in court, and 66% of divorce cases use Facebook as a principal source of evidence, according to a recent law review article. These are striking numbers worth paying attention to if you’re considering divorce.

A Real World Issue

Your social media posts can and will be used against you.

Just imagine you are on a dating website before you separated from your spouse. Or, in a moment of anger or frustration you post about your divorce and/or your spouse. How might this affect what a judge decides about the custody of your children or your finances?

Now imagine that you claim because of a back injury you cannot work and need alimony, but there are pictures up on the internet of you dancing on a bar, horseback riding, or doing a cartwheel. What might that do to your alimony claim?

Obtaining Social Media Evidence is Easier Than You Think

A person can usually download the profile and postings of others with whom they are “friends” on the site. If your spouse has “un-friended” you, you can ask someone else to secure your spouse’s social media.

Some people going through divorce “un-friend” their spouse and their spouse’s friends and family on their social media, feeling a false sense of security that their spouse is not going to see their profile and posts. Not only does this hurt their relationship with these people, but if someone sees something on your profile that they find interesting, you’d be surprised how quickly it makes its way back to your spouse.

Be aware you can also ask for enforceable discovery requests for the other side to download and produce their social media account profiles and postings. And, your spouse can also subpoena your social media profiles, accounts and postings directly from the provider. 

If you’re posting on social media, you must assume that whatever you post will be seen by your spouse, and if you don’t settle, a judge. If you are considering a divorce, immediately consult a lawyer and stop posting social media. There are rules about the destruction of evidence, which may include social media. When meeting with a lawyer provide them full disclosure about what there is online about you. 

And, going forward, the best way to protect yourself is to not post.  

Steps To Protect Your Inheritance And Gifts Received From Third Parties

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

Did you know that, if handled correctly, your inheritance and individual gifts from third parties are non-marital property?

Many people received inheritances and gifts from their families during their marriage. In Maryland, property received prior to marriage, by a gift from a third party or inheritance, or directly traceable to such sources is your non-marital property – meaning you keep it and it will not be divided with your spouse in divorce. 

Similarly, in DC, property received prior to marriage, by a gift or inheritance, or property in exchange therefor is your separate property – meaning you keep it and it will not be divided with your spouse in divorce.

The problem that many face is that they co-mingle, or mix, their non-marital or separate funds with marital funds. For example:

  • They deposit non-marital/separate funds into an account with marital money, or
  • In reverse they deposit marital funds into the account holding the gift or inheritance, their spouse deposits money into the account holding the gift or inheritance, they “loan” money to the marriage and pay themselves back with marital funds into the account holding the gift or inheritance, or even title the gift or inheritance in joint name.

If you have property prior to marriage, or receive property by gift or inheritance during the marriage, keep it separate!

If it’s investible assets, I suggest depositing and investing them at a new banking institution where you do not keep any other monies, and whatever you do, do not add to it.  Also, maintain all paperwork showing where the money came from along with monthly or annual statements from the date of your marriage onward in a safe place.

When in doubt, consult a divorce attorney.