Let’s Collaborate!

Over the first two weeks in March, we completed training to qualify us to practice Collaborative Divorce. In sharing feedback at the conclusion of the training, we both are excited about having a new option to offer our clients in terms of process.

Perhaps the most enticing part of Collaborative is the team-based approach and the transparency – it is a holistic approach that empowers clients to make informed decisions for their family’s future. Collaborative also offers a paradigm shift from the standard approach to separation and divorce; it discards the traditional, adversarial, position based approach in favor of a cooperative, interest-based approach that is often less combative and more constructive.

What is Collaborative Divorce and how does it compare in terms of process and cost to more traditional options like litigation?  Inspired after our training, we break it down for you here:

The Collaborative process represents an entirely different construct than the traditional litigation model. It forges an entirely distinctive path. Unlike mediation or even similar collaborative-style dispute resolution tools, a true collaborative process, governed by a Collaborative Participation Agreement, operates in a wholly different universe than litigation.

The Collaborative process is the definition of ‘pot committed.’ Both parties commit fully, to each other and the process, from the outset.  The process requires more than just a theoretical commitment. The parties must hire a Collaborative team, including attorneys for both parties, one or more “coaches,” a financial neutral, and perhaps other neutrals such as a child specialist, a forensic business valuator, or mental health professional. All of the professionals will have received training in the Collaborative process.

Some of the anchors of the Collaborative process are:

  • No Litigation
  • Client Self-Determination
  • Full Disclosure
  • Cross-team Communications
  • Creativity

How does the cost compare to a traditional case proceeding in a litigation model? 

Litigation: The cost of filing a complaint for divorce is relatively nominal, perhaps a couple hundred dollars, but then the case may take a life of its own as the issues grow and expand and more professionals must be involved. So, the expense starts out small and balloons in ways the parties may not have anticipated. Additionally, there are two sets of expense, for every issue and professional. 

Collaborative:  The upfront investment is larger, but the universe is well-defined. There is efficiency in hiring joint neutrals for some roles, and the parties are jointly incentivized not only to narrow the issues in their case but also the related expenses.   

As with so many aspects of separation and divorce, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to choosing the right process for you. The circumstances of each case, including the personal dynamics between the parties are critical considerations. 

Anyone considering the Collaborative process should seek advice from a qualified and collaboratively trained divorce attorney regarding all of the potential divorce options so you can carefully choose the process that meets your need. 

For more information, contact Heather at hscollier@lerchearly.com or Chris at cwroberts@lerchearly.com.