Children are Still Struggling While Adults Return to Normalcy

As more of our population becomes fully vaccinated against Covid-19, many of us are now able to enjoy a greater semblance of normalcy. Mask-less trips to the grocery store, a return to the office, summer get-togethers with friends, weekend trips, and vacations are increasingly the norm.

For parents, however, it is important to understand that our children are not experiencing the same level of recovery. Children whose parents are in the process of separation or divorce have an even greater burden.

Children under age 12 cannot yet receive a Covid vaccine. Even children over age 12 who are able to be vaccinated have rules still in place in their schools and extracurricular activities. Most children have not experienced a full return to school or all of their regular extracurricular activities, and nearly all schools and other activities still require children to wear masks, among other restrictions. On top of that, many children have missed significant life events, including school graduations, the special senior years, missed college trips, and the special freshman years.

The disruption to children’s normal lives and schedules negatively impacted children in a variety of ways. Many kids experienced isolation during the pandemic. Children’s reliance on the internet brought with it an overreliance on electronics, and in many cases an over-indulgence or dependency on screens. While there is a dearth of robust medical studies to help us understand the full impact of Covid, incidents of mental health issues among children of all ages are reported to have increased during the pandemic.

To continue reading, check out the full article on Lerch Early’s website: https://www.lerchearly.com/news/children-are-still-struggling-post-vaccine-while-adults-return-to-normalcy.

What Does Divorce Mean for Your Vacation Home?

If you own a vacation home, odds are that you consider it a place of serenity and fond memories. When couples separate and divorce is on the horizon, the question is inevitably asked: “What happens to our vacation house?”

First, you and your spouse can always agree on what to do with your vacation home. Examples of the types of agreements you and your spouse could reach are: agreement to sell it and divide the proceeds, one spouse could buy-out the other spouse’s interest and keep the home, or perhaps the home becomes part of a bigger picture estate plan or trust so that children and grandchildren may continue to enjoy it, despite any divorce. You can agree with your spouse about the fate of your vacation home at any time during the divorce process. You don’t have to wait until the divorce is final.

If you and your spouse cannot agree and you have a contested divorce case, your trial will likely be a year or more away. The court will decide what will happen to your vacation home only at the end of the entire process – and the court is limited to two options:

  1. Order the sale of a jointly titled vacation home and the equal division of any sales proceeds; or
  2. If the vacation home is titled only in one spouse’s name, the court cannot transfer title to the other spouse. However, if the home was acquired during the marriage with marital funds, the non-titled spouse has a martial property interest in the home. The court may order the spouse who owns the home to make a monetary award payment to the other spouse in consideration of their interest in the home and as part of the overall equitable distribution of marital property. “Equitable” does not always mean equal – who gets what depends on the courts consideration of a variety factors – some of which include the duration of the marriage, each party’s age, health, financial circumstances, and contributions to the marriage and property, and the circumstances that contributed to the divorce.

If you and your spouse do not agree on what to do with your vacation home, consider that prior to the actual divorce, the court cannot:

  • Force you or your spouse to sell your home;
  • Force you or your spouse to refinance any debt associated with the home;
  • Force your or your spouse to move out of a jointly titled vacation home. The one exception to this is if a party is ordered stay-away from a vacation home being used as one or both parties’ residence incident to a domestic violence protective order;
  • Force you or your spouse to pay the mortgage or carrying costs.

Also, if you and your spouse do not agree on what to do with vacation home, and it is titled in joint name or solely in your spouse’s name, the court cannot transfer it to you.

You and your spouse can enter into an agreement to do something other than what the court can do, which is legally binding and enforceable.

Before filing in court or entering into any divorce related agreement, you should consult with a family law attorney to determine what effect this has on the other issues in your case.

The Court has more options when it comes to what can happen to your primary home in a divorce. For more information about that, see our article, “What does divorce mean for your home?

For more information, contact Heather at hscollier@lerchearly.com and Erin at elkopelman@lerchearly.com.


Preparing for Separation and Divorce

AvatarDonna E. Van Scoy, Principal

It is wise to meet with a divorce attorney, if possible, before your separation. If not, do so close to your separation.

Obtaining information about the process and having your questions answered helps with the stress and uncertainty. It also enables you to participate in how your divorce will proceed.

To locate an attorney communicate with your family, friends, co-workers, professional contacts, and community contacts. You can also search the internet for divorce lawyers and lawyer organizations that provide information about divorce lawyers. You will be spending a lot of time and sharing personal information with your attorney. Be sure you feel that you are being listened to and your questions are being answered. Be sure you are comfortable with your attorney.

If you have a child(ren) you will need to be prepared to discuss the legal and physical custody of the child(ren). Legal custody is the parental decision making regarding the child(ren) and their health, education and welfare. Physical custody is where and when the child(ren) will have custodial access with each parent. Child support is also a topic. As is which parent will remain in the family home or if both will relocate.

Depending on the length of the marriage and the financial picture of each party, alimony can be an issue. Review your monthly household expenses. Be prepared to discuss your family lifestyle. If you are a stay at home parent, you will need to share you educational background and work history. If you are the parent who provides the financial support for the family (or the majority of the financial support), be prepared to share each parent’s contributions and your position on the future financial contribution of the other parent. If you and your spouse are a two career family, be prepared to discuss the finances moving forward and the needs of each household.

Consider bringing three to five years of tax returns to your initial consult. Preparing a document that sets out all of you and your spouse’s assets is helpful in providing you with a complete and working picture. When preparing the document include all houses, land, vehicles, bank accounts (separate and joint), credit cards, debts, retirement accounts, investment accounts, stocks, art, jewelry, inheritance, and any others accounts or items of value. Provide all information. The attorney can help you determine what is important.

If you are not in a place to do the pre-work above, an attorney can still obtain your factual information, ask questions to fill in the blanks and share the law with you. They can assist you in putting your information together and prepare you to begin the divorce process. An attorney can also discuss the options available to secure your divorce. They will provide you information on negotiation, mediation, collaborative law, arbitration, and litigation.

For more information, contact Donna at 301-610-0110 or devanscoy@lerchearly.com.

The Truth Will Set You Free: Why Credibility is Currency in Divorce and Custody Cases

AvatarErik Arena, Principal

Most of us have done things we are embarrassed about or ashamed of — things we would rather not share in polite company, for fear of being judged.  We omit, shade, deflect or deny for the sake of maintaining appearances. 

This tendency surfaces frequently in family law courtrooms across Maryland and the District of Columbia, where judges and magistrates are, in fact, tasked with assessing the fitness and credibility of spouses and parents every day. Spouses and parents must decide, sometimes rather quickly, whether or not to tell the unvarnished truth about themselves, or a glossier, filtered version. All too often, they choose poorly. 

Why? For two reasons:

  1. Each lie of avoidance, omission, or denial erodes your credibility with the Court, which can be very hard to overcome in totality

Of course, the goal is to put yourself in the best light. However, that is done by being honest – not be being beyond reproach. Simply put, it is better to present to the Court as an honest, flawed person, than one who is untruthful. This applies to just about everything not otherwise protected by the 5th Amendment privilege against self-incrimination. 

Believe it or not, the Court has heard it all at one time or another. And none of us is perfect. A few lies, denials, or omissions, particularly those that are verifiably false, can be enough to taint the Court’s impression of your overall character for truthfulness and place a cloud over all of your testimony [and future testimony in future actions]. That can be far more costly than the embarrassment, humiliation, or damage done by admitting your mistakes. 

  • In family law cases, many important facts cannot be corroborated by independent testimony or documents, meaning key issues can be decided solely based on the credibility of the parties. 

Trying to wallpaper over character flaws with deceit can have grave consequences for other important factual determinations that, oftentimes, must be based solely on a party versus party credibility assessment [due to the absence of corroborating testimony or documents]. 

So, what kinds of critical fact determinations can end up being made solely based on credibility? I have listed a few examples below to illustrate their magnitude:

  • Who did the majority of the parenting during the children’s formative years;
  • Whether or not you told your spouse it was ok not to go back to work;
  • Whether or not the money you received from your spouse’s parents to buy your first home was a gift to your spouse or to you and your spouse;
  • Whether or not your or your spouse’s spending was a cause for friction during the marriage;
  • Whether or not you had an affair years ago, or even recently (for more on this, check out the blog post from my colleague Liz Estephan: “You Committed Adultery. Now Tell Your Divorce Lawyer.“;
  • Whether or not the cash you withdrew from your joint checking account was spent on family expenses or other, less beneficial purposes;
  • Whether or not the money you wired to family was discussed with your spouse prior to so doing;
  • Whether or not you drank to excess or used illicit substances;
  • Whether or not you humiliated or belittled your spouse or children in private. 

As you can see, being dishonest in some areas, or several, can call into question the credibility of the testimony you will give on other, more weighty facts critical to the Court’s determinations of property, alimony, or child custody. 

So, when faced with telling the (perhaps) ugly truth or saying what you think the Court wants to hear, there really isn’t a choice. Only by being truthful can you mitigate the damage done to the Court’s assessment of your character and, consequently, the merits of your case. The slope is far steeper and slipperier for those lacking in candor.

For more information, contact Erik at eparena@lerchearly.com or 301-657-0725.

You Committed Adultery. Now Tell Your Divorce Lawyer.

Liz EstephanLiz Estephan, Attorney

You and your spouse are on the cusp of getting a divorce or are already in the midst of the divorce process. You’ve been unfaithful, but are unsure if your spouse is aware. Do you admit you committed adultery? When do you admit you committed adultery? Should you tell your lawyer? When do you tell your lawyer?

These are all valid questions and concerns. You should be upfront and honest with your lawyer about past transgressions.

Your lawyer cannot properly defend or protect you if you are not honest with him or her. Be straightforward, do not try and sugarcoat what you did or did not do. You didn’t hire a lawyer to judge you and he or she should not — it’s not his or her job. Your lawyer’s job is to zealously advocate on your behalf.

However, your lawyer cannot do so if he or she is unaware of all the facts of your case. If your lawyer is aware of your transgressions, he or she is able to better control the narrative and will decide if or when there is a proper time to divulge the information to your spouse.

If you are not upfront with your lawyer, you could make strategic mistakes that have repercussions in litigation. For example, your answer to your spouse’s Complaint and Answers to Interrogatories must be signed under penalty of perjury. If you deny outright that you committed adultery under oath, you committed perjury.

Also, your spouse may have evidence that demonstrates you did indeed commit adultery and could use it against you at trial or another evidentiary hearing. If so, your credibility will be severely undermined in front of a judge and in turn, could have a detrimental effect on your case.

Don’t hide the truth about adultery from your lawyer. Being honest with your lawyer is to your benefit.

For more information, contact Liz at 301-907-2811 or erestephan@lerchearly.com.

Should I Borrow or Accept Money from Family While Getting Divorced?

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

Cash flow is a common concern for most people going through separation or divorce. Many clients ask me if they can accept or borrow money from family.

While accepting or borrowing money from family may seem like an economical option because it often does not require a loan agreement, interest, penalties or preapproval, it can actually have unintended and potentially harmful consequences on the remaining aspects of your divorce.

Gifts from Family

Two issues that arise when you receive gifts from your family to pay expenses if you are divorcing are: (1) those gifts can be considered income to you; and (2) that gift, had you not spent it, would be yours to keep in divorce and not divided with your spouse.

First, gifts from your family received during the marriage, especially if given routinely, can be included and counted as your income in divorce.  The gifts can increase your income for purposes of determining alimony and child support, with the potential effect of requiring you to pay more or receive less alimony and/or child support. Also, the gifts can be considered in the equitable division of marital property. Therefore, receiving gifts from family may have a negative impact on you in the outcome of your divorce as it relates to alimony, child support and the equitable division of marital property.

Second, gifts from your family to you individually during the marriage are your sole, separate and non-marital property. Generally, if you can prove the source of the gift is from your family and that it is not comingled with marital property, then you keep gift, and it does not get divided between you and your spouse in divorce. If you receive gifts from your family, you should not spend them. You should instead keep them and not comingle them with marital property. For steps on how to protect gifts from family, check out this article on Steps to Protect Your Inheritance and Gifts Received from Third Parties.

Assume that you’re getting divorced, there is $50,000 in marital funds, you need to pay bills of $20,000, and your parents give you $20,000. You have two options. In Option A, you spend the $20,000 gift from your parents. In divorce, you and your spouse will equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $50,000, so you and your spouse will each get approximately $25,000 in marital funds. In Option B, you preserve the $20,000 gift from your parents and do not comingle it with marital funds, and you pay the $20,000 in bills from marital funds. In divorce, you and your spouse will equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $30,000, so you and your spouse will each get approximately $15,000 in marital funds, and you will keep $20,000 from your parents. So, while your spouse ends up with $15,000, you end up with $35,000. You are better off with Option B.  Therefore, if you need money, spend marital money first, rather than gifts from family.  Preserve and do not spend the gifts from your family.

Loans from Family

Two issues that arise if you receive loans from your family to pay expenses in divorce are: (1) you may be left solely responsible for those loans; and (2) loans from family may not be given as much weight as other debts.

First, you are likely to be left solely responsible for the debts you incur in your sole name.

Maryland Courts cannot allocate debts, so after divorce you will be solely responsible for the debts in your name. D.C. Courts can distribute debts accumulated during the marriage, but there are no guarantees in court. If you are getting divorce and individually borrow money from your family to pay bills, the remaining and unspent marital property will be equitably divided. While debt is considered in the equitable division of marital property, in Maryland you will be left responsible for the debts in your individual name, and in D.C. you could be. So, when possible, it is better to spend marital property rather than taking a loan.

Assume that you’re getting divorced in Maryland, there is $50,000 in marital funds, and you need $20,000 to pay bills. You have two options. In Option A, you take a loan for $20,000. In this situation, at the time of divorce you and your spouse will each equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $50,000, so in divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $25,000 each, but you have a $20,000 loan that you are solely responsible for. In actuality, this leaves you with only $5,000 net and your spouse with $25,000 net. In Option B, you pay the $20,000 from the $50,000 marital funds. This leaves $30,000 remaining in marital funds, so in the divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $15,000 each. You are better off with Option B. Therefore, if you need money, spend marital money first before you take a loan.

Second, if you are taking a loan, it is up to the Court how much to weigh the evidence in their ultimate decision when equitably dividing the marital property (and in D.C. when also equitably dividing the debts accumulated during the marriage). Courts may be less likely to heavily weigh debts from family, as opposed to debts from banks or on credit cards. Therefore, if incurring a debt is necessary, then consider getting a debt from a bank or putting it on a credit card. If you choose to get a loan from family, then you should at a minimum sign a note or other loan document confirming the money is a loan and the repayment terms.

In summary, you are likely better off spending marital assets, as opposed to spending money from family, whether gifts or loans because whatever marital assets are left will be divided between you and your spouse. If you do need money and cannot access marital funds, then I suggest you take a loan, rather than spending gift money, and check out my article Should I Get a Loan While Getting Divorced? 

Each case is different, so if you find yourself needing money, you should consult a family law attorney. At Lerch, Early & Brewer, we guide our clients through the day-to-day decisions they have to make in the divorce process so that they make decisions that are in their best interests. 

For more information, contact Erin at 301-347-1261 or elkopelman@lerchearly.com.

Let’s Collaborate!

Over the first two weeks in March, we completed training to qualify us to practice Collaborative Divorce. In sharing feedback at the conclusion of the training, we both are excited about having a new option to offer our clients in terms of process.

Perhaps the most enticing part of Collaborative is the team-based approach and the transparency – it is a holistic approach that empowers clients to make informed decisions for their family’s future. Collaborative also offers a paradigm shift from the standard approach to separation and divorce; it discards the traditional, adversarial, position based approach in favor of a cooperative, interest-based approach that is often less combative and more constructive.

What is Collaborative Divorce and how does it compare in terms of process and cost to more traditional options like litigation?  Inspired after our training, we break it down for you here:

The Collaborative process represents an entirely different construct than the traditional litigation model. It forges an entirely distinctive path. Unlike mediation or even similar collaborative-style dispute resolution tools, a true collaborative process, governed by a Collaborative Participation Agreement, operates in a wholly different universe than litigation.

The Collaborative process is the definition of ‘pot committed.’ Both parties commit fully, to each other and the process, from the outset.  The process requires more than just a theoretical commitment. The parties must hire a Collaborative team, including attorneys for both parties, one or more “coaches,” a financial neutral, and perhaps other neutrals such as a child specialist, a forensic business valuator, or mental health professional. All of the professionals will have received training in the Collaborative process.

Some of the anchors of the Collaborative process are:

  • No Litigation
  • Client Self-Determination
  • Full Disclosure
  • Cross-team Communications
  • Creativity

How does the cost compare to a traditional case proceeding in a litigation model? 

Litigation: The cost of filing a complaint for divorce is relatively nominal, perhaps a couple hundred dollars, but then the case may take a life of its own as the issues grow and expand and more professionals must be involved. So, the expense starts out small and balloons in ways the parties may not have anticipated. Additionally, there are two sets of expense, for every issue and professional. 

Collaborative:  The upfront investment is larger, but the universe is well-defined. There is efficiency in hiring joint neutrals for some roles, and the parties are jointly incentivized not only to narrow the issues in their case but also the related expenses.   

As with so many aspects of separation and divorce, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to choosing the right process for you. The circumstances of each case, including the personal dynamics between the parties are critical considerations. 

Anyone considering the Collaborative process should seek advice from a qualified and collaboratively trained divorce attorney regarding all of the potential divorce options so you can carefully choose the process that meets your need. 

For more information, contact Heather at hscollier@lerchearly.com or Chris at cwroberts@lerchearly.com.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Telling Your Children Their Parents are Getting Divorced

AvatarDonna E. Van Scoy, Principal

Few couples marry with the thought that someday they will be divorced. Fewer couples have children with the thought that they will be children of divorce.

Despite parties’ intentions, divorces happen. If you have children and decide to divorce, PLEASE make every effort to work together to tell your children you are getting divorce. Your children will remember how they found out their parents were getting divorced. Your children will remember how each parent told them or if a parent did not discuss the divorce with them. Your children will remember how each parent acted during the divorce. PLEASE put your children first when telling them their parents are divorcing.

Whether your children are five, 18, or somewhere in between, you are their parent, their mom or dad. They need you to be the adult during this emotional time in their lives. You and your spouse will also be dealing with your own real and raw emotions. Every effort needs to be made to work together regarding the information your children receive so it is consistent and they do not become involved in the details of the divorce.

DON’TS:

  1. Do not race to be the first parent to tell your children that their dad or mom is leaving the family. There is no need to tell your children that their mom or dad is having an affair. There is no need to tell your children that dad or mom is unhappy and wants to go live their own life.
  2. Do not refuse to allow your children to communicate or see their parent because your spouse hurt you or they are being unreasonable in the divorce. Nothing good can come out of you refusing to allow your children to attend an important family event with their other parent because it is you “time.” Remember your children are part of each of their parent’s families. Your children love both of their parents and both sides of their family.
  3. Do not share details of the family finances with your children. Do not specifically blame the other parent as a reason they cannot have something or do something.  While better not to address, if necessary, come up with joint and consistent statements to the children about financial issues.
  4. Do not use your child(ren), no matter how old they are or how much they offer, as a sounding board to discuss the divorce. It is important during your divorce to have a support person and/or group. That person or group cannot be your child(ren). Look to organized groups, a therapist, friends, and relatives (minus the children).
  5. Do not ever share any written documents or Court documents concerning your divorce with your children. It does not matter how old your children are they are still the children and the document is still sharing information about their Mom and Dad.

DO’S:

  1. Love your children more than you dislike your spouse. You children deserve to hear that each parent loves them and that the love will not change because of the divorce. They need to hear the divorce was not their fault.
  2. If possible, tell your children together with your spouse about the divorce. For suggestions on how to talk to your children consider speaking to their pediatrician, a therapist, reading articles, and/or reading a book. Investigate the best way to communicate with your children depending on their age. Determine if you should tell all your children together or separate. If as parents you cannot tell your children together, agree on a plan of how, when, and what to tell them separately. Don’t ignore their questions and answer them in an age appropriate manner. Share with your spouse details of the discussion.
  3. Allow your children to take their possessions (including clothing, outerwear, uniforms, and shoes) between households. Respect the other parent and children by timely returning and sharing the possessions. If important to the children and possible, allow the family pet to travel with the children. Be extra patient with your children as they learn to move between homes. Both parents need to work together when items are forgotten or misplaced.
  4. Observe your children. It is possible they may need and/or benefit from seeing a therapist. If you are unsure but concerned, contact their pediatrician, teacher, and/or school counselor. Also, speak with your spouse.
  5. Spend quality time with your children. This will be a hard time for you and your children. Spending time together will help you and will help your children. Making new memories allows everyone to move forward.

For more information, contact Donna at 301-610-0110 or devanscoy@lerchearly.com.

Visualizing Your Life: Achieving Your Post-Divorce Goals

Chris RobertsChris Roberts, Principal

I have found that an effective way to face divorce is to visualize your future post-divorce life, then work backwards (so to speak) from that end goal to take the steps necessary to achieve it. This strategy can help you shape the positions you take during the divorce and create a light at the end of the tunnel.

I discuss this concept in detail above. Please don’t hesitate to follow up with me at cwroberts@lerchearly.com and check out my bio for more on my practice and background: https://www.lerchearly.com/people/christopher-w-roberts.

Decisions, Decisions: Can your spouse make them for you if you lack capacity?

AvatarHeather Collier, Principal

Too often couples find themselves in a situation where due to age, illness, or accident, one spouse no longer has the ability to make decisions or handle life’s responsibilities – in legal terms, that spouse lacks “capacity” – and there is no plan in place.

What happens then? Can your spouse make decisions for you simply because they are your spouse? If not, are they able to obtain authority to make decisions on your behalf even if you are already incapacitated?

My colleague and fellow guardianship practitioner, Jenica E. Cassidy, associate attorney at Lerch, Early & Brewer, joins us as a guest author on this post to answer these questions:  

Can my spouse make decisions for me if I lose capacity just because they are my spouse?

If you become incapacitated, your spouse does not automatically have authority to make all of your decisions and handle your affairs. This can have far-reaching implications, ranging from accessing your bank account and paying your bills to speaking with doctors and consenting to medical procedures. If you don’t already have a power of attorney and an advance healthcare directive in place, your spouse may have no other option but to seek guardianship over you.

What is guardianship?

Guardianship is a legal procedure where a court appoints guardian for a person who has been determined to lack capacity to make and communicate responsible decisions for themselves and handle their personal affairs.

The guardian can be appointed to handle financial matters or healthcare and personal matters, or both. The guardian essentially steps into the shoes of the incapacitated person and has control over all aspects of the person’s life. Because of this, the court takes guardianship very seriously. A person seeking guardianship over another must file a detailed petition along with medical certifications verifying the incapacity. They must also provide notice to people close to the incapacitated person. The court will appoint an attorney to represent the incapacitated person and will hold a hearing before appointing a guardian. If anyone objects to the guardianship, the contested matter could proceed to a jury trial.

Suffice it to say, the guardianship process can be emotionally taxing, financially burdensome, and may carry on for many months. On top of that, it requires disclosing deeply personal information to a public record where a judge or jury will make the ultimate decision regarding who has control over your affairs.

What can I do now to make sure I have control over who makes decisions for me if I am not able to make them for myself?

It’s best to avoid guardianship if you can. It’s meant to be a matter of last resort after all other options have been exhausted. The best way to do this is to plan ahead. Prepare the appropriate estate planning documents. Name your spouse or a trusted individual to make decisions for you and handle your affairs should you lose the ability to do so on your own.

What type of lawyer do I look for to help me with these issues?

If you are planning ahead, see an estate planning lawyer to help you prepare the appropriate estate planning documents, including powers of attorney and advance medical directives, designating who has authority to make decisions for you in the event of certain circumstances.

If you are trying to pursue a guardianship over a loved one, see a family law lawyer or elder law lawyer who handles guardianship matters.

For more information, contact family law attorney Heather Collier at hscollier@lerchearly.com or elder law attorney Jenica Cassidy at jecassidy@lerchearly.com.