Should I Get a Loan While Getting Divorced?

Erin KopelmanErin Kopelman, Principal

If you’re going through a separation or divorce and cash flow is tight, you’re not alone. Many families going through separation or divorce find it difficult to get their hands on cash and pay expenses, especially with the increased cost of going from having one household to two, and paying lawyers. Many people wonder if they should get a loan.

In general, at the time of divorce, the then-existing marital assets are valued and equitably divided between you and your spouse. In valuing an asset, the fair market value is reduced by any loan on which it is collateral.

For example, the value of a house is reduced by its’ mortgage. The Court determines what is equitable after considering a list of factors, which include, but are not limited to: each spouse’s contributions to the family, the economic circumstances of each party, the circumstances that contributed to the estrangement of the marriage, the duration of the marriage, each party’s age and health, etc. These factors include consideration of each party’s debts. While equitable does not mean equal, absent extraordinary circumstances, the division of marital property often ends up being equal or close to it. Also, in divorce, Maryland Courts cannot allocate debts, so you are stuck with the debts in your name; whereas the D.C. Court can distribute debts accumulated during the marriage. Therefore, when possible, it is better to spend marital property, rather than taking a loan.

For example, say that you are in Maryland and are getting divorced. You and your spouse have $50,000 in marital funds, and you need $20,000 to pay bills. You have two options. In Option A, you take a loan for $20,000. In this situation, at the time of divorce you and your spouse will each equitably divide the remaining marital funds of $50,000, so in divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $25,000 each, but you have a $20,000 loan that you are solely responsible for. In actuality, this leaves you with only $5,000 net and your spouse with $25,000 net. In Option B, you pay the $20,000 from the $50,000 marital funds. This leaves $30,000 remaining in marital funds, so in the divorce you and your spouse will each likely get $15,000 each. You are better off with Option B.

If you find yourself needing money in divorce, I usually suggest, in order of priority:

  1. If possible, always spend marital assets first on your reasonable living expenses and attorney’s fees. This will reduce the marital property being divided, but this is preferable to taking out a loan where you could be solely responsible for paying it back.
  2. If you cannot access marital assets to spend first, then take a withdrawal from a marital asset. Taking a withdraw from a marital asset reduces the value of that asset, so the reduced value is considered when valuing the asset for purposes of equitably dividing it. Again, this is preferable to taking out a loan where you could be solely responsible for paying it back.
  3. If you cannot take a withdrawal from a marital asset, then take a loan from a marital asset. Taking a loan against a marital asset can reduce the value of that asset, so the reduced value may be considered when valuing the asset for purposes of equitably dividing it. However, in Maryland, if the loan is in your sole name, you will be solely responsible for the loan payments in the divorce.
  4. Only if you cannot spend marital assets or take a withdrawal or loan against a marital asset should you turn to the option of incurring non-collateralized debt.

Each case is different, so if you find yourself needing money, you should consult a family law attorney. At Lerch, Early & Brewer, we guide our clients through the day-to-day decisions they have to make in the divorce process so that they make decisions that are in their best interests.

For more information, contact Erin at 301-347-1261 or elkopelman@lerchearly.com.